Naval Station Tutuila Radio Station the year it was constructed 1918.
(Photograph courtesy of the American Samoa Office of Archives and Records Management)

 

Naval Station Tutuila Radio Station
as it looked in 1938.

(Photograph courtesy of the American Samoa Office of Archives and Records Management)
 
Naval Station Tutuila Radio Station
as it looks today.

09
Radio Station

The naval station's first radio set-up operated from a hill outside the naval station. In 1917, with World War 1 raging, the Navy Department directed the dismantling of this station and the installation of the apparatus in a new building on the naval station Navy Bldg. No. 38. This building now serves as the Territorial Registrar's Office. The walls of this single story structure marked a new element in Tutuila's architecture. To overcome termites, rats, and hurricanes, they were constructed of locally manufactured concrete blocks moulded to imitate rough-cut stone, with concrete lintels and sills. The building measures sixty feet square feet. Originally the veranda extended along all for sides of the building. Today the veranda along the west side and half of the north (rear) side has been boarded in. (There are plans to remove this boarding to restore the original verandas for American Samoa's upcoming Centennial in the year 2000.)

The original front of the building faced south looking on to the stations's main road. Here the Navy emplaced a concrete low relief lintel reading "U.S. NAVAL COMMUNICATION SERVICE." The roof today is pitched and is made of corrugated iron. This building is listed separately on the National Register of Historic Places and as part of the Tutuila Naval Station Historic District.